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      3 Reasons to Practice the Discipline of Unplugging

      Over the weekend, I unplugged when I traveled to the Poconos to go camping with a group of friends from New Jersey.  For the most part, I left my phone in the car.  I didn’t have access to the internet, to my blog, or to e-mail.

      There was something amazingly refreshing about unplugging.  I spent time with great friends.  I fished.  I read.  I enjoyed great food.  And I relaxed.

      The time away reminded me three important things about unplugging.

      3 Reasons to Practice the Discipline of Unplugging

      1. Unplugging provides a necessary break.  I’ve been going a million miles a minute.  I work hard at work, and I do a lot of things outside of work.  I run.  I write.  And I keep up with a busy family.  I stay connected to a world of emails, blog posts, and social media connections.  I don’t give me self a chance to rest, and I’m guessing I’m not alone.  We all need the opportunity to rest.  Sometimes this means disconnecting from the world – even if it’s just for a day.
      2. Unplugging provides an opportunity for new inspiration.  While we are racing from one thing to the next, we are missing out on the beautiful world God gave us.  There’s inspiration right in front of our eyes.  We just need to stop and look from time to time.  I was inspired by the beauty of a quiet lake, a rushing river, and face to face conversation with friends.  I would have missed this opportunity if I didn’t unplug for the weekend.
      3. Unplugging provides time to reconnect with what is important.  The rush of life can sometimes take us away from what is important.  The computer world and the world of television can become consuming.  We need to put it in perspective.  My time away unplugged gave me a fresh and renewed perspective on my faith, my family, and my friends.

      I challenge you to unplug.  It may seem hard at first, but you can start small.  Start with a minute each hour.  Then try an hour each day.  When you have this down, unplug for a day each week.  Finally, unplug for a weekend or even a week.  I guarantee you’ll be refreshed, inspired, and reconnected.

      When was the last time you unplugged?  What did you learn from unplugging?